Monday, April 23, 2012

Psychiatry Books

Psychiatry Books


Search Results

  1. Clinical Trials in Psychiatry
  2. books
    .google.comBrian S. Everitt, Brian Everitt, Simon Wessely - 2008 - 248 pages - Preview
    At last – a new edition of the highly acclaimed book Clinical Trials in Psychiatry This book provides a concise but thorough overview of clinical trials in psychiatry, invaluable to those seeking solutions to numerous problems relating to ...

  3. Psychiatry and Heart Disease: The Mind, Brain, and Heart
  4. books
    .google.comMichelle Riba, Lawson Wulsin, Melvyn Rubenfire - 2012 - 272 pages - Preview
    This unique book will help psychiatrists to understand better the risks of cardiovascular illness and cardiologists to appreciate possible pathophysiological links with psychiatric conditions.

  5. Handbook of cultural psychiatry
  6. books
    .google.comWen-Shing Tseng - 2001 - 855 pages - Preview
    This is the first book of its kind to be written in textbook style for national and international readers and particularly for clinicians working in multiethnic societies.

  7. Textbook of Hospital Psychiatry
  8. books
    This is the only textbook on the market today that provides information for psychiatric hospital clinicians and administrators in a single all-inclusive volume.

  9. Psychiatry essentials for primary care
  10. books
    Psychiatry Essentials for Primary Care now becomes the cornerstone work that helps physicians help those with mental disorders. Book jacket.

  11. Principles and Practice of Geriatric Psychiatry
  12. books
    .google.comMohammed T. Abou-Saleh, Mohammed M. Abou-Saleh, Cornelius L. E. Katona - 2011 - 934 pages - Preview
    Featuring contributions by distinguished authors from around the world, the book offers a distinctive angle o; issues in this continually developing discipline. Principles and Practice of Geriatric Psychiatry provides a comprehensive ...

  13. Introductory textbook of psychiatry
  14. books
    .google.comDonald W. Black, Nancy C. Andreasen - 2010 - 717 pages - Preview
    Now in its fifth edition, this best-selling book has been revised and updated to reflect the latest advancements in the field.

  15. Listening to Prozac
  16. books
    .google.comPeter D. Kramer - 1994 - 409 pages - Snippet view
     

  17. New Scientist - 14 Mar 1963 - Page 589
  18. books
    .google.comVol. 17, No. 330 - 52 pages - Magazine - Full view
    How have they contrived this implication in a book whose chosen period closes over a hundred years ago? Here let the authors speak for themselves: This book owes its inception to the fact that as practising psychiatrists we were ...

  19. Child Psychology and Psychiatry: Frameworks for Practice

books
.google.comDavid Skuse, Helen Bruce, Linda Dowdney - 2011 - 318 pages - Preview
David Mrazek, Professor of Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Written by leading clinicians and research experts in the fields of child development and psychopathology, this book is an authoritative and up to date guide ...



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What makes belief a delusion?

What makes belief a delusion?

Psychiatry for General Practitioners (Repost) | Free eBooks Download - EBOOKEE!

Psychiatry for General Practitioners (Repost) | Free eBooks Download - EBOOKEE!

Psychiatry for General Practitioners (Repost)

ISBN: 8122427324

Category: Technical

Tag: Science/Engineering


Download Babylon Translation Software for Free!
Posted on 2012-04-22. By anonymous.

Description



R.C. Jiloha, "Psychiatry for General Practitioners"
New Age International | 2010 | ISBN: 8122427324 | 220 pages | PDF | 0.8 MB

Psychiatry, being an allied branch of Medicine, is undergoing rapid changes. There have been many new advances in the causation, symptomatology, classification, diagnosis and management of mental disorders. The textbooks on psychiatric practice as applicable to Indian setting are few. A major portion of these textbooks is devoted to the psychiatric practice in western countries and is not practically oriented. Most of these textbooks do not contain the important aspects of psychiatry required by a general practitioner. The present book, Psychiatry for General Practitioners is an attempt to rectify most of these lacunae.

[Directly Download] Psychiatry for General Practitioners (Repost)!
Read more at http://ebookee.org/Psychiatry-for-General-Practitioners-Repost-_1831107.html#p7zOR3IaEFc4MDJy.99

Forensic Psychiatry News Review - 8:48 AM 4/23/2012 - Mike Nova's starred items

Google Reader - Mike Nova's starred items


Forensic Psychiatry News Review - 8:48 AM 4/23/2012 - Mike Nova's starred items

 

On entry to prison, almost one-fifth of prison entrants were referred to the prison mental health services for observation and further assessment. Young people in juvenile detention facilities also have high rates of mental illness ...


A Decent Solution to Chronic Criminality: How to Alter Kids' Course
Patch.com
Many teen offenders then move into adult prisons and come out with a “Ph.D. in criminology” and no help re-entering society in a healthy manner. So says San Diego photojournalist and urban anthropologist Susan Madden Lankford, author of a trilogy of ...

and more »


New York Times

A Spate of Teenage Suicides Alarms Russians
New York Times
Experts blame alcoholism, family dysfunction and other kinds of fallout from the Soviet Union's collapse, as well as the absence of a mental health structure and social support networks to help troubled young people. They also agree with Mr. Medvedev ...

and more »


7Online.com

Long Island doctor accused of raping patient
7Online.com
by FRANK ELTMAN SANDS PONT -- A psychiatrist who had his medical license suspended, then revoked, more than a decade ago because of misconduct allegations is accused of raping a woman he was treating for depression inside his Long Island office, ...

and more »


NY police arrest psychiatrist on charges he raped a female patient | The Republic
The Republic
FRANK ELTMAN AP MINEOLA, NY — A psychiatrist who had his medical license suspended, then revoked, more than a decade ago because of misconduct allegations is accused of raping a woman he was treating for depression inside his Long Island office, ...

and more »


Mother Nature Network

What 'insanity' means for Norwegian gunman
Mother Nature Network
Loughner is undergoing psychiatric treatment in the US Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Missouri. [Extremism in Prison (Infographic)] People declared not guilty by reason of insanity don't walk free — like Loughner, they're committed.

and more »

More psychiatry is likely to be practiced in public mental health settings in California, enhancing the need for better preparation in management and leadership.Abstract Teaser

This post has been generated by Page2RSS

via prison psychiatry - Google Blog Search by Mike Nova on 4/23/12
Mentally ill offenders are subject to poor medical practices due to lower in-prison standards of mental health care. Ill inmates are managed by staff members who are insufficiently trained in treating mental illnesses, and they ...

What 'insanity' means for Norwegian gunman | MNN - Mother Nature Network

What 'insanity' means for Norwegian gunman | MNN - Mother Nature Network

What 'insanity' means for Norwegian gunman

Anders Behring Breivik, who killed 77 people in Norway in July 2011, wishes to be sentenced as sane, but the court may not give him that option.

By Stephanie Pappas, LiveScienceWed, Apr 18 2012 at 4:13 PM EST

Anders Behring Breivik
STANDING TRIAL: Right-wing extremist Anders Behring Breivik has his handcuffs removed in the central court in Oslo, April 19, at the start of the fourth day of his trial (Photo: Daniel Sannum Lauten/AFP)
Norwegian gunman Anders Behring Breivik, who has admitted killing 77 people in bomb and gun attacks last July, has told judges his actions were political and he was acting in self-defense against a "multiculturalist" conspiracy. His extremist motivations, however, are less likely to determine his fate than whether the court finds him sane or insane.
In Norway, defendants qualify for an insanity defenseonly if they can prove they were in a state of psychosis and not in control of their own actions during the crime. One court-ordered psychiatric examination found Breivik insane, with psychiatrists writing that he was driven by delusions and paranoid schizophrenia. However, a second evaluation held he is sane, according to news reports.
Some U.S. states have a test for legal insanity that's similar to the one used in Norway, said Landy Sparr, the director of the forensic psychiatry training program at Oregon Health & Science University.
"You could have psychiatrists agree on the diagnosis but disagree on whether or not the defendant could control his actions at the time of the crime," Sparr told LiveScience.
Insanity in context
The insanity defense has a long history: Even in ancient Rome, "lunatics" were not held accountable by the legal code, and English common law dating back to the 1200s allowed "madness" as a criminal defense. An early landmark case occurred in 1843, when a gunman named Daniel M'Naghten attempted to kill British Prime Minister Robert Peel in the belief Peel was trying to kill him. M'Naghten accidentally killed Peel's secretary instead; he was declared insane, prompting outrage among British politicians and the public. The case led to the establishment of "the M'Naghten rule," which held that defendant could be considered legally insaneif they did not understand the act they committed or that the act was wrong.
In the United States, 27 states still hold to this standard, Sparr said. Twenty-two others have added a second standard for qualifying for insanity, called the "volitional prong." If a defendant understands right from wrong but was still driven to commit a crime by an "irresistible impulse," he or she also could qualify for legal insanity, Sparr said. Norway uses a modification of this standard, asking whether a defendant was in control of his actions during the crime.[10 Controversial Psychiatric Disorders]
Legal insanity is not the same thing as a medical diagnosis of mental illness, Sparr added. Psychologists and psychiatrists can testify to a defendant's sanity or lack thereof, but it is up to juries to determine whether the defendant's mental state excuses him of liability for his crime.
"When a psychiatrist evaluates somebody, they don't write up an evaluation and then make a comment or statement about whether this person knows the difference between right and wrong," Sparr said. Such a statement would make no difference in treating a psychiatric condition, he said. But in the court of law, it can be the key to a case.
Controversy and insanity
The insanity defense can be especially controversial in a high-profile case such as Breivik's. But in the U.S., that defensive strategy is actually quite rare: Only about 1 percent of criminal defendants use it, and juries reject about four of every five insanity pleas, according to West's Encyclopedia of American Law.
In many cases of severe insanity, the defendant is declared not competent to stand trial and is committed to a psychiatric facility. This was the case with Jared Loughner, accused of killing six people and wounding Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in a shooting spree in Tucson, Ariz., in 2011. Loughner is undergoing psychiatric treatment in the U.S. Medical Center for Federal Prisoners in Missouri. [Extremism in Prison (Infographic)]
People declared not guilty by reason of insanity don't walk free — like Loughner, they're committed. In many cases, an insanity defense can end with the defendant locked up for longer than he would have been under another defense.
"Especially for medium-level crimesand low-level crimes, you definitely are in the mental hospital longer" than you would spend in prison, Sparr said.
In a case of multiple murders, as Breivik is charged with committing, neither prison nor a psychiatric hospital is likely to lead to a quick release, Sparr said.
If found sane, Breivik would face a maximum 21-year prison sentence, with options to extend his incarceration if he is still considered a danger to society. If declared insane, the confessed killer would be involuntarily committed to a psychiatric facility for as long as he is considered ill.
Breivik himself wants to be sentenced as sane and has called the possibility of being found insane "the ultimate humiliation."
You can follow LiveSciencesenior writer Stephanie Pappas on Twitter @sipappas. Follow LiveScience for the latest in science news and discoveries on Twitter @livescienceand on Facebook.
Related on LiveScience:
Copyright 2012 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved.
 

Mental Health in Prisons

Mental Health in Prisons

Mental Health in Prisons




As mentally ill offenders fill US prisons...

The number of incarcerated mentally ill men and women is a growing trend in the United States. Today, the percentage of prisoners with mental disease outweighs the percentage of the general population that struggles with similar maladies. Reasons for this trend include gradual deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill and inadequate community mental health services. Moreover, a social mindset that declares that mentally unstable people should be behind bars has also contributed to making overcrowded U.S. prisons the primary place of mental treatment—at a significant cost taxpayers.

...they encounter abusive conditions and limited treatment.

This development has led to numerous challenges for mentally ill people in the criminal justice system. Insufficient mental health screening and lack of collaboration between the public and prison health systems exacerbate mentally ill prisoners’ conditions by inhibiting treatment. Mentally ill offenders are subject to poor medical practices due to lower in-prison standards of mental health care. Ill inmates are managed by staff members who are insufficiently trained in treating mental illnesses, and they suffer abuse from fellow inmates when mixed with the general prison population. Upon release, reentry planning often excludes access to medical insurance and fails to connect inmates with community treatment facilities, further threatening offenders’ chances of avoiding re-arrest.

Justice Fellowship calls for compassionate, competent care.

Justice Fellowship believes that successful treatment of mentally ill offenders entails quality medical attention; trained prison staff; universal, performance-based prison health care standards that mirror those outside prisons; separate facilities to protect the mentally ill from abuse; and using community or family-based rehabilitation programs in lieu of correctional institutions when possible. To this end, Justice Fellowship endorsed the passage of the Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act in 2004, which authorized $50 million for grants to states and localities to set up mental health courts and treatment programs for offenders. Justice Fellowship also advocated for the Second Chance Act of 2007, which authorizes additional grants for mental treatment programs. Pursuing these objectives gives mentally ill offenders the respect they are due and increases the chances for complete and effective restoration.

Justice eReports

House Passes Second Chance Act, 347-62
November 2007, Vol. 6, No. 12

Report on Violence and Abuse in Prisons
June 2006, Vol. 5, No. 5

Two New Laws Provide Important Justice Reform
October 2004, Vol. 3, No. 27

 

Mental Health in Prisons | Faktensucher

Mental Health in Prisons | Faktensucher

Apr222012

Mental Health in Prisons

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Mental Health in Prisons.

As mentally ill offenders fill US prisons

The number of incarcerated mentally ill men and women is a growing trend in the United States. Today, the percentage of prisoners with mental disease outweighs the percentage of the general population that struggles with similar maladies. Reasons for this trend include gradual deinstitutionalization of the mentally ill and inadequate community mental health services. Moreover, a social mindset that declares that mentally unstable people should be behind bars has also contributed to making overcrowded U.S. prisons the primary place of mental treatment—at a significant cost taxpayers.

please, read the whole article there http://www.justicefellowship.org/key-issues/issues-in-criminal-justice-reform/issue-5


Norwegian gunman says pain of losing touch with his family is like grief of victims’ families - The Washington Post

Norwegian gunman says pain of losing touch with his family is like grief of victims’ families - The Washington Post

Norwegian gunman says pain of losing touch with his family is like grief of victims’ families

Stian Lysberg Solum, POOL/Associated Press - Defendant Anders Behring Breivik waits in court at the start of the 5th day of his mass killing trial in Oslo, Norway on Friday. Confessed mass murderer Breivik testified Thursday in a chilling account of his preparations for the massacre of 77 people.
OSLO, Norway — The right-wing extremist who confessed to a massacre of 77 people in Norway compared on Monday the pain he caused the families of his victims to his own situation, saying he lost contact with his friends and family after the July 22 attacks.
Anders Behring Breivik, 33, showed no remorse as he continued his shocking testimony about his shooting spree at the annual summer youth camp of the governing Labor Party.
Gallery
Calling the rampage “necessary,” Breivik compared being shunned by those close to him to the grief of the bereaved.
“The only difference was that for my part it was a choice,” he said.
Breivik has confessed to the bombing and shooting rampage but rejects criminal guilt, saying the victims had betrayed their country by embracing immigration. Even the defense admits there is virtually no chance of an acquittal, so the key issue to be determined in the trial is whether Breivik is criminally insane.
Two pscychiatric examinations reached opposite conclusions on that point. Breivik himself insists he is sane, and accuses the prosecutors of trying to make him look irrational.
“I know I’m at risk of ending up at an insane asylum, and I’m going to do what I can to avoid that,” he told the court.
Breivik became defensive as prosecutors quizzed him about sections of the 1,500-page manifesto he posted online before the attacks. It describes uniforms, medals, greetings and codes of conduct for the “Knights Templar” militant group that he claims to belong to. Prosecutors don’t believe it exists.
In one section, read by prosecutor Svein Holden, Breivik speculated that in his future society, the loyalty of potential knights might be tested by asking them to undergo surgical amputation and castration. Breivik chastised the prosecutor for what he called “low blows” and said the segment was taken out of context.
The self-styled crusader apologized to the family of a pub owner who was among the eight people killed in the blast outside the government offices in Oslo, saying it was not his intention to kill “civilians.”
Holden asked him if he wanted to express a similar apology to the families of the other victims, including the 69 killed on the youth camp on Utoya island.
“No I don’t,” Breivik said. “Utoya is a political indoctrination camp.”
“I see all multicultural political activists as monsters, as evil monsters who wish to eradicate our people, our ethnic group, our culture and our country,” he said.
Jon Hestnes, who heads a support group for victim’s families and survivors, told Norwegian broadcaster NRK that Breivik’s apology was “pathetic.”
Speaking calmly, Breivik said he used a handgun to kill victims if the distance was less than 10 meters. Otherwise he used his rifle.
Asked why he spared one man who survived the shooting spree, Breivik said he thought it was because the man’s appearance made him look “right wing-oriented.”
“When I looked at him I saw myself,” Breivik said. “I think that was the reason that I didn’t fire shots at him.”
If found sane Breivik would face 21 years in prison though he can be held longer if deemed a danger to society. If sentenced to psychiatric care, in theory he would be released once he’s no longer deemed psychotic and dangerous.
Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Google Reader - Mike Nova's starred items - 6:42 AM 4/23/2012

Google Reader - Mike Nova's starred items
6:42 AM 4/23/2012

via In the news by Karen Franklin PhD by Karen Franklin, Ph.D. on 4/22/12
Illustration credit: Jock Alexander, The Australian
You have no doubt heard of journal "rankings." A journal's rank conveys information about the impact and quality of a journal. This can be useful information for both authors and consumers. An author might want to consider a journal's prestige, and the difficulty getting published in it. For consumers -- including expert witnesses who might be relying on a particular article in court -- ranking can serve as a proxy for the accuracy and reliability of a journal's content. How much should the trier of fact trust the information in this journal?

But there are lots of methods for ranking journals -- the Impact Factor, the Eigenfactor, the h-index, just to name a few. And with the proliferation of journals in forensic psychology, it gets hard to keep track. Which journals have the best reputations? Which are the most cited? Which provide the broadest coverage of forensic psychology topics?

One popular way to rank-order journals is based on reference counts. How many times a journal is cited is an indicator of its reputation. In forensic psychology, according to an unpublished study by S. Black, the top-referenced journals are (in rank order):
  1. Law and Human Behavior
  2. Behavioral Sciences and the Law
  3. British Journal of Psychiatry
  4. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology
  5. American Journal of Psychiatry
  6. Criminal Justice and Behavior
Now, a researcher with training in both psychology and library science has taken a somewhat different approach, devising a clever content-analysis procedure to rank-order journals in our field.

Chris Piotrowski started by screening several texts in the field and choosing terms that are popular both in research and practice. The 16 terms were: eyewitness testimony, competency to stand trial, alcoholic blackouts, infanticide, sentencing, forensic evaluations, polygraph, malingering, jury selection, homicide, diminished capacity, insanity defense, child abuse, Daubert standard, child custody and expert witness.

Next he used PsycNET, "the recognized major bibliographic resource in the social and behavioral sciences that indexes scholarly and professional journals," to run keyword searches on his 16 terms. For each search term, he rank-ordered journals based on the frequency of hits; a journal's total ranking was obtained by summing across all 16 terms.

The winners were (in rank order):
  1. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and Law
  2. PsycCRITIQUES (formerly, Contemporary Psychology)
  3. Law and Human Behavior
  4. Behavioral Sciences and the Law
  5. American Journal of Forensic Psychology
  6. Journal of Psychiatry and Law
  7. Bulletin of the American Academy of Psychiatry and Law
  8. Mental & Physical Disability Law Reporter
  9. American Journal of Psychiatry
  10. American Psychologist
  11. Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice
  12. International Journal of Psychiatry and Law
  13. Journal of Criminal Justice
  14. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice
  15. Journal of Applied Psychology
  16. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology
  17. Psychological Reports
  18. British Journal of Psychology
  19. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law
I would be a little cautious about relying on this method, because the choice of keywords -- which is open to manipulation -- might influence the rankings. But as you can see, there is overlap between this method and the more traditional citation-count method used by Black. For instance, Law and Human Behavior and Behavioral Sciences and the Law made it into the top four, no matter which method was used. There are some noticeable differences as well, with several journals that were highly cited in Black's study not ranking high using this content analysis method.

For more information on the method and the exact scores for each journal, feel free to contact Dr. Piotrowski (HERE); I'm sure he will be happy to share a copy of the article, which is published in the current issue of the American Journal of Forensic Psychology.

Oh, in case you were wondering, that journal is number five on his list.

The article is: Top cited journals in forensic psychology: An analysis of the psychological literature (2012), American Journal of Forensic Psychology 30 (2), 29-38.

via forensic psychiatry - Google Blog Search by Karen Franklin, Ph.D. on 4/22/12
Law and Human Behavior; Behavioral Sciences and the Law; British Journal of Psychiatry; Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology; American Journal of Psychiatry; Criminal Justice and Behavior. Now, a researcher ...

via Prison News on 4/22/12
When he walks in to court flashing a right-wing salute. When he testifies effortlessly about killing their children, brothers and sisters as if they were flies.


State prison healthcare still needs independent oversight, report says
Los Angeles Times
The report also raised concerns about high spending on inmate health, citing a 2010 national survey showing California spent $16000 per inmate for medical, mental and dental care -- at least three times the national average. Spending on medical care ...

and more »

The chief of the state's juvenile justice system says early rehabilitation programs are especially important for kids with mental health issues.

via prisons - Google Blog Search by George on 4/22/12
Although the U.S. abolished debtors' prisons in the 1830s, more than a third of U.S. states allow the police to haul people in who don't pay all manner of debts, from bills for health care services to credit card and auto loans.

via prisons - Google Blog Search by ozymandias42 on 4/22/12
The Prison Rape Elimination Act (which is already inadequate, but at least it's a step) does not apply to ICE detention centers, which means that there is almost no meaningful steps taken to end the sexual abuse of prisoners.


Boston.com

First the Nightmare, Then the News
New York Times
It was Anders Behring Breivik I wanted to see. I had seen innumerable images of him already, of course, read innumerable articles — even what he himself had posted on the Internet before he detonated a bomb in Oslo and drove out to the island of Utoya ...
As killer gloats in court, Norway shows no angerBoston.com
Breivik to give last day of evidence on Norway massacreBBC News

all 905 news articles »


The Guardian

Don't blame video games for Anders Behring Breivik's massacre
The Guardian
But when killers cite specific video games as being "training tools" for their killing sprees, as Anders Breivik admitted this week, it becomes more difficult to dismiss the headlines as reader bait. The link between video games and mass murder was ...
Breivik played violent video gamesNews24
Is Anders Breivik the Biggest Controversy to Hit the Call of Duty Franchise Yet?On Video Games

all 13 news articles »